ForgetfulCat

TTT Guide v1.0

4 posts in this topic

*This guide is not quite done, but it's still readable in its current state; none of the links to separate sections exist yet, however.*

(The important bits are bolded, if you just wanna skim through them.)

Trouble in Terrorist Town: A Guide

So you hop into your first TTT match, excited to shoot other terrorists, and you get shot five seconds into the round. Not only that, but people are accusing you of RDM somehow (whatever that is), even though you were only alive long enough to realize you were holding a crowbar. How is this gamemode supposed to be fun?

Well, allow me to show you, in this comprehensive guide on how to play TTT. Later on, we will also cover some of what you can expect from the TTT staff, so that you know how to properly interact with them in order that all involved can have a fun gaming experience. Towards the end, we will go over how “breaking the rules” in some cases can be fun and enjoyable for everyone (at least on Hearthigen). But before we delve into how you can safely break the rules, you need to have a solid understanding of the rules themselves.

Note: I recommend playing by the rules for your first few TTT sessions, in order to really gain an understanding of the gamemode and to gain the trust of the Hearthigen TTT staff. This is usually a vital step that must be taken before you can start playing a little more “rebelliously.”

Basic Concept of the Game:

TTT is about a group of terrorists who discover they have a traitor (or traitors) in their midst. The vast majority of the terrorists are “innocents,” that is, they have no objective other than to survive (accomplishing this usually requires finding out who the traitors are and killing them). A minority of the terrorists (usually 1/4 of the total players) are designated “traitors.” It is the job of these traitors to eliminate all the innocents. An even smaller minority (usually 1/8 of the total players) are detectives… but we’ll get to that later.

Game Structure:

The gametype takes place across many maps, and each map will contain around ten “rounds.” These rounds are all self-contained, and no information carries over from round to round (other than karma, which will be discussed in detail later).

Each round starts with a “preparing” phase that lasts around 15 seconds or so. This phase exists so that people can spawn in, grab the weapons they want from around the map, and get ready for the round. Nobody can damage each other during this phase, but you can still die from fall damage (although you will automatically respawn at the end of the preparing stage if you die).

At the end of this “preparing” stage, the player’s role is revealed to them (either innocent, traitor, or detective). At this point, people now know what their objective is, and players can now be killed. This phase contains all the core gameplay. Most servers (Hearthigen included) use the system called “haste mode,” which means that the round starts with five minutes left on the clock, and the round timer increases with each player killed (in Hearthigen’s case: 30 seconds per kill). Once the five minutes are up, the round goes into “overtime,” which lasts until the full round timer has run out. During this phase, traitors can see how much time is left in the round, but innocents and detectives cannot. This serves to hide from them how many people have died so far (since the amount of time left is equivalent to total deaths*30)

When the round is over (all innocents have been eliminated, all traitors have been eliminated and some innocents have survived, or the round timer ran out), a dialog box will pop up on screen saying which side won (along with some tabs for viewing the important events in the round and the scoreboard).

This starts the “end round” phase, which will last a roughly equivalent time to the “preparing” phase. This is simply a time for players to relax and talk to each other about how awesome the round was, as well as look over the tabs on the dialog box (if they want to). Most servers, Hearthigen included, allow players who are still alive after the events of the round to attempt to kill each other. No points are awarded for this “post-round dm”, but it sure is fun. :)

Note: The only significant thing about “overtime” (as far as Hearthigen is concerned) is that it is then okay to kill AFKs (since they could be traitors and we wouldn’t want the round to drag on further).

Roles:

No matter what role you are (innocent, traitor, or detective), you must observe. Listen to voice chat, read text chat, and look at your surroundings. This is one of the main reasons that people mess up in TTT; they do not observe. For example, knowing that somebody has already been called out as a traitor is important, so that you know to shoot at them if you see them.

You must also check the scoreboard regularly, by pressing “tab.” It shows each players kills and deaths, as well as karma, but all that is not of much importance. The thing you need to be paying attention to is which category each player is listed under: “terrorists” or “confirmed dead.” There is a third category that only traitors can see, but that’s discussed in more detail here. If a player is listed under “terrorists,” they are alive, or at least nobody knows they are dead yet. If a player is listed under “confirmed dead,” they are… dead, obviously. Knowing how many traitors there are is important (and Hearthigen’s server will tell you at the beginning of each round how many traitors and innocents there are). Process of elimination can often be used in this game. If you see that only you and one other player is listed under “terrorists,” and you are innocent, you then know that the other live player is a traitor.

Note: There is a fourth category in the tab menu: “spectators.” This is just for people who aren’t playing or who have just loaded into the server, however, and so is not of particular importance to this guide.

So, observe and remember to “check tab.” Now let’s discuss each role in a bit more detail.

Innocent (Green):

If you are an “innocent,” it is in your best interest to find (or purchase from PointShop) a weapon that you can use to defend yourself. If somebody starts shooting you, shoot back. While you’re shooting back, call out that whoever is shooting you is a traitor (use their name please; there’s very little in life more annoying than hearing somebody scream “Um! This man… this uh… he’s a traitor! This guy is a trai-“). For this reason, a microphone is exceptionally helpful in TTT, since typing would likely get you killed in a situation like this. There is a “terrorist radio chat” feature available as well, discussed here.

If you see someone shooting someone else (assuming nobody said anything beforehand in chat), shoot the person who started it. Sometimes, someone will call out a traitor in chat, and so you have to check to make sure the person being shot is not the traitor before taking action. If they happen to be the traitor who was called out, help the person already shooting. As you most likely see by now, the action you take can vary greatly on the context of the situation.

As an innocent, you must protect the detective(s), as they are your best hope for finding the traitors. (This is due to the fact that detectives have access to special items that are used to track down traitors.) If a detective orders you to do something, do it (within reason; obviously ordering you to jump off a ledge is silly).

Find the traitors. Kill ‘em. You have the advantage of numbers; they have the advantages of surprise and cool gadgets.

Traitor (Red):

If you are a “traitor,” it is advantageous to open traitor shop immediately, and purchase whatever items you think will help you the most (I recommend body armor and radar as your first purchases, myself). If you don’t plan on using traitor shop that round, send your credits to your traitor buddies (whose names are highlighted red on the tab scoreboard, and are also shown to you at the beginning of the round). You can also press “u” to use team text chat in order to communicate with your traitor buddies. You can also press “shift” to use traitor-only voice chat (your voice indicator will be red when using this). It is also important to note that your traitor buddies will have a red “T” over their heads throughout the round, which can be seen across the map and through walls. This can help give you an indication of where your buddies are and what they are doing.

It is then up to you and your traitor buddies to coordinate your actions to eradicate the innocents and detectives. It is generally wise to kill detectives first, since they are the ones most likely to find out that you are a traitor. You also get more credits for the traitor shop by doing this, as mentioned earlier.

It is wise to act when you are alone with another innocent. This way, you will be able to kill the innocent before he is able to call out that you are a traitor. Maintaining stealth is important as a traitor. If one of your traitor buddies is in trouble, it is likewise advantageous to help him. However, there are cases when it is better to not do this. If there are many innocents around, it makes more sense for you to do nothing, and let your traitor buddy die. This way, you will be able to keep secret the fact that you are a traitor, and thus you can live on and avenge his death later. It feels cruel to let a comrade die, but hey, you are traitors, after all.

While we’re on the topic of traitor buddies, it’s also smart to communicate what you’re about to do, so that your plans don’t harm your buddies. For example, if you plan to go out in a blaze of glory and start shooting up a room of innocents, be a good teammate and tell your buddy that you’re about to do so. This way, he can either leave the room so that he can live on, or he can help you kill the innocents, depending on the situation and the chances of survival.

You can also use deception. Instead of calling out someone who shot you, like innocents do, you can simply call out anyone you like. For example, “<Player Name> shot at me! Kill him!”. If you get caught in a lie however, you will find yourself being called out as a traitor. Let’s say the person you falsely accused of shooting you is traveling with a group of innocents, who can all plainly see that he didn’t shoot at you. In that case, you’d be in trouble. The art of deception as a traitor is discussed more here.

On some maps, traitors also have access to a variety of “T traps” and sometimes “T rooms,” discussed here.

Detective (Blue):

If you are a “detective,” your name is highlighted in blue on the scoreboard for all to see. You also automatically have body armor equipped, so you’re just a bit stronger than your innocent comrades. The detective is the most misunderstood role in TTT, since it’s the rarest role to get, and most people just view it as another “innocent.” When used properly however, the detective can lead the innocents to victory.

The detective has a detective shop he can access, full of tools to combat the traitors. (I recommend buying the radar first.) You can also use “u” to use team chat, which in some cases may be useful if you are trying to coordinate actions between detectives (this is a fairly rare occurrence though; usually detectives just talk in “all” chat).

Detectives are a proven innocent (since it is not possible for them to be both a detective and a traitor), so they are in a unique position to “test” people and call out kill orders. On several maps, there are “traitor testers” that are usually used by detectives. These are discussed in more detail here.

Detectives can call out kill orders on players (if they have proof that the player in question is a traitor, of course), and innocents don’t need to question whether the kill order is legitimate (as they might have to if the order were given by someone else, who may or may not be a traitor), because a detective would have no reason to deceive anyone. This puts detective in a position of power, somewhat. On the other hand, detectives also need to be careful, since they are likely to be the first target for traitors.

Probably the most important part of being a detective has to do with the “role” slot, which is used for the detective’s DNA scanner, an exceptionally useful tool. The DNA scanner is described more here.

In some maps (this is very rare), there are “detective rooms,” which function similarly to “traitor rooms.” Although, I don’t really see why a detective would need a room to himself; seems kinda silly. I don’t know, but some maps have ‘em. They’ll usually be indicated by blue coloring of some sort, so that the detective can feel special.

Mechanics:

The mechanics are very similar to Counter-Strike: Source, which makes sense since TTT is built from the assets of that game. This brings up an important point: namely, CS:S is required for TTT. It’s really not a fun gamemode without it, since most of the items will appear as error signs or pink and black checkerboards.

Hearthigen’s TTT server lends itself to some CS:GO mechanics as well. The aiming system feels more fluid than most servers, and I’m not just saying that. It truly feels distinct from other TTT servers.

Hearthigen also automatically gives players a higher jump height and health regen over time. These two things change the gameplay drastically from other TTT servers.

Looking at a Player:

When you hover your reticle over a player, you can see their name, a one-word description of their health (“healthy,” “near-death,” etc.), and their karma status (which will be discussed later). You can also use the tab menu to mark certain players as “innocent,” “kill,” etc., so that when you look at them, that will also be displayed. (I don’t use that feature very often, but if it’s convenient for you, go ahead and use it.)

Default Items and How to Use Them:

Everyone’s default item, no matter their role, is the crowbar. This is essentially your melee weapon, which you can use to hit people (though that is rarely useful) or break open vents, press buttons, etc. You can also right-click with it to “push” people forward a bit (this will do no direct damage to them, though you could knock them off a cliff or something).

The second default item is the magneto stick, an item that is often overlooked, despite its usefulness. This is what you use to interact with the environment. You can use left-click to give objects a little push, but more importantly, you can use right-click to pick up items. You do NOT have to hold right-click in order to do this, a mistake which newer players often make. Simply click once, and you will have picked up an item (assuming it isn’t too heavy for you to lift). There is a way to “throw” items by whipping your mouse across the screen and right-clicking a second time, letting go of the object and letting it continue its momentum. This is generally how people “prop-kill” other players, by using a prop’s velocity to damage another player upon contact.

Note: Keep in mind, you can also pick up ammo and guns from hard-to-reach places with your magneto stick! These items will automatically be added to your inventory when brought close enough to your character.

Note: The magneto stick can ALSO be used to pick up dead bodies, a very useful thing in some instances. When holding a body, traitors can click when looking at a wall or a ceiling to hang a dead body from it, to spook the innocents.

The third default “item” is holstered. This is just a stance in which your character is not holding anything. This can make you appear less threatening to others. That’s… about it for this one.

Weapon Slots:

It is at this point that I should mention that you have a set amount of “slots” in your inventory: 1-9. These can be accessed quickly by pressing the number keys (or you can just scroll though ‘em with mouse wheel, like most people probably do). You will have to scroll to whatever weapon you want, and then left-click to confirm that you want to pull that weapon out.

Your default starting items take up three slots already, which leaves you with one primary slot, one secondary slot, one grenade slot, one “role” slot (only used for the detective’s DNA scanner, I believe), and two “special” slots (usually only used by traitors and detectives). This means you can only carry one primary and one secondary, which means that if you want to grab a pistol off the ground, you must switch to your currently equipped pistol and press “q” to drop it, thereby letting your character to automatically pick up the next pistol you walk over.

Weapons Placed Around the Map:

There is an endless variety of primary and secondary guns that spawn around the map; there’s no possible way I could cover them all here. Additionally, on Hearthigen at least, we are continuously working to bring you balanced gameplay by tweaking each and every weapon, so they may change considerably over time. Many of the weapons used are from CS:S, but some are created by modders, and others are created by us. Ammunition is also placed around the map.

The ‘nade slot, on the other hand, is fairly limited. There are generally only three grenades, though of course there are addons that can provide more. The first main grenade is the smoke grenade, which… does exactly what it sounds like, provides a smoke screen. The second is an incendiary grenade, which will detonate with an extremely small explosion and set fire to the area around it. The third is the discombobulator, which is a non-lethal grenade that pushes things around it and can move nearby players, disorienting them. These three grenades can be useful, in fairly limited scenarios. Mostly they’re just fun to mess around with.

Special Weapons:

Traitors and detectives have access to special traitor and detective shops, respectively. The only difference between the two is that they provide different items, suited for each role. Both can be accessed by pressing “c”. There are special weapons that can be purchased from these shops, in exchange for credits. Credits are discussed more here.

These special weapons purchased from traitor and detective shops vary from server to server, and some items are arguably more useful than others. Each item costs 1 credit, in order to keep it simple. Some are passive items, such as body armor (which detectives have automatically) or radars. Others are used for deception, such as the disguiser, radio, advanced disguiser, decoy, or ID bomb in the traitor shop. Others are used for detective work, such as the defuser or the visualizer in the detective shop. And then the rest are just plain weapons, used for killing players more efficiently. Most of these will take up one of the two “special” slots upon purchase.

I encourage you to experiment with all these traitor and detective weapons, as they are all interesting, and can be utilized in a variety of situations to make your role just a little easier.

Note: You can still use the movement keys while you are in the traitor or detective shop, which is useful because continuing to move forward while using the shop will prevent you from being a sitting duck, should somebody take that time to shoot at you. It will also prevent players from saying “LOOK! THAT GUY’S IN THE T SHOP; HE’S NOT MOVIN’!”.

PointShop:

This is actually separate from the TTT gamemode, but is included in most servers as an addon. If you have played Gmod before, you are most likely familiar with this one. The pointshop can be accessed with F3, and you can use in-game points (accumulated automatically over time, or via some special actions, such as joining the Hearthigen steam group) to purchase items. In Hearthigen’s TTT pointshop, there are several tabs. The first is Weapons, which allows you to purchase weapons that would be placed around the map. You only get these for one round. There are also Donator tabs for donators and staff, from which can be purchased some “special” weapons as well (i.e. things that would normally be purchased from the traitor or detective shop). There are also playermodels and hats and trails, like most pointshops. None of these affect gameplay, and so are not worth discussing further here.

I’m Dead, What Do I Do?:

You don’t have to do anything; in fact, you should NOT communicate with living players. This is not possible in-game, since living players cannot hear nor see dead chat. However, if you communicate with a living player in TeamSpeak, Skype, Steam message, private admin message, etc., then you are doing what is known as “ghosting.” Ghosting, put simply, is giving players information that they would not otherwise know, through out-of-game means. After you are dead, you are dead. Living players will have to figure out what happened by themselves. That’s the fun of the game; don’t spoil it by ghosting.

When you are dead, you can spectate other players, which can be fun in some cases. You can also take control of props, which is an interesting mini-game within TTT. You do this by going into free-cam mode and pressing “e” on a prop. You can then spam the movement keys (including jump) when your “punch-o-meter” is high enough. This feature prevents people from spamming props around the map, but still allows them to move occasionally.

However, the prop possession mini-game is mostly dead now, thanks to a new mini-game that a majority of servers include: death-match. This is simply Counter-Strike: Source: Laggy Edition. It’s not bad, but it could definitely use improvement in my opinion. Regardless, you shoot each other with guns, with infinite respawns, until the round ends. You can enter this by typing “!dm” in dead chat. You can leave it the same way, should you desire. Pressing tab will allow you to see who is in death-match (in a fifth category!); living players can not see this category, since that would reveal to them who the dead players are (which would ruin the game somewhat).

Tab Menu in Detail:

There are three main categories in the tab menu: “terrorists,” “missing in action,” and “confirmed dead,” in that order. We have already discussed “terrorists” and “confirmed dead,” and every role can see those, so let’s move on to “missing in action.” This is a category that only traitors can see. It lists those players who are dead, but whose bodies have not yet been identified (meaning nobody else knows they are dead). This is a vital aspect to the game, since it allows the traitors to know who is dead, while also allowing them to deceive the innocents into thinking that there are more players alive than there actually are. This hinders the innocents’ ability to use the “process of elimination,” because they don’t know which players are actually dead.

So what moves a player from “missing in action” to “confirmed dead” (or from the innocents’ point of view, from “terrorists” to “confirmed dead”)? This is where identifying (or ID’ing) bodies comes into play.

ID’ing Bodies:

When a player is killed, their body is not automatically identified. It is instead shown as an “unidentified body,” as shown here:

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When someone presses “e” on the body, it opens a menu for them, listing a lot of information about the dead player (their name, the last player they saw before dying, the weapon they were killed by, if they were headshot or not, the amount of time before the DNA expires, the time in the round they were killed at, their last words if they were typing in chat at the time of death, etc.). I personally rarely find a need to look at any of this information, though in some cases it could be helpful. Usually I just quickly double-tap “e” to open and close the menu quickly, so I can keep moving. Why even bother to stop and ID the body at all then, you ask? Well, because the menu is only part of what ID’ing the body does. More importantly, ID’ing lets everyone in the server know that the player is dead, what their role was, and that I ID’ed the body, as shown here:

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It will also change the body from saying “unidentified body” to listing the player’s name, as shown here:

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After the body is “ID’ed” in this way, the dead player will be listed under “confirmed dead” for everyone. This gives the innocents/detectives one less player to think about, and allows them to find the traitor more easily, since there are less players for them to suspect. For this reason, traitors will usually hide unidentified bodies in corners or closets. However, they must be careful when doing this, since getting seen while carrying an unidentified body will most likely result in death. Innocents would have no reason not to ID the body, and so people will assume that whoever is carrying the unidentified body is a traitor (which in most cases, they are).

Note: The menu that is shown when ID’ing a body also contains a button that says “call detective.” This can be pressed to create an indicator on the screen of a detective that will lead them to the body, usually so they can get DNA off of it. Traitors can be super sneaky and use this feature to lure a detective to a body in order to kill them. Be careful, detectives.

ID’ing a body is also what the traitors/detectives use to grab credits off a dead body (as mentioned earlier). Any unused credits will remain on the body, and are up for grabs. In this instance, the little-used feature of pressing “alt-e” on the body can be useful. Pressing “alt-e” on a body allows you to view the menu of the body, grabbing any credits off of it, WITHOUT actually ID’ing the body! This means it will remain like this:

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One more thing to go over in this section (I know talking about pressing “e” on corpses isn’t all that thrilling). If you walk past an unidentified body, people will most likely scream at you to “ID that body!” This is because, as I said before, an innocent would have no reason not to ID a body. Therefore, walking past an unidentified body (even if you just didn’t notice it) immediately makes players suspicious of you. As an innocent, it is in your best interest to ID any and all bodies you come across. If you are a traitor and you are walking with some innocents, it is also in your best interest to ID that body. Sure, you don’t really want to ID the body as a traitor, but it’s better than getting shot because you walked past it.

Terms to Know:

There are a few terms specific to TTT that are important to know. I’ve already gone over all the concepts associated with these terms; I just haven’t used the terms explicitly.

KOS:

Kill on Sight.

This is used when someone is calling someone else out as a traitor. Instead of saying “<Player Name> is a traitor!” they just say “KOS <Player Name>!”. It’s quicker, and you’re more likely to be able to get it out through voice chat before getting killed.

RDM:

Random Death Match.

This is when a player kills another member of his team (i.e. innocent kills innocent). This can be a mistake or a result of a traitor’s deception, but often it is just a player being stupid. Randomly killing another member of your team is bad; don’t do it. The staff will punish you for doing this, no matter if it’s an innocent killing an innocent, a detective killing an innocent, an innocent killing a detective, or a traitor killing a traitor. Of course, the staff will make every effort to ensure it wasn’t just a mistake (firefights can get out of hand sometimes, leading to friendly fire). RDM can ALSO be killing another player without proof, even if that player ends up being a traitor. RDM is covered in more detail here.

Suspicion:

Not quite a KOS.

Players can call suspicion on another player for doing something… well… suspicious. If someone’s killing someone else, you call a KOS on them. If someone’s following someone else while aiming at them, you call suspicion (since there is not enough proof for a full-fledged KOS). In my opinion, calling suspicion on another player is entirely pointless, since nobody remembers who was suspicious ten seconds after, since there is so much going on in each round. I would just stick to KOS’s if you have proof, myself.

Proven:

Someone who is a confirmed innocent.

Someone can be proven if they are shown to be innocent by being “tested.” Someone can also be proven if they kill a traitor (since a traitor wouldn’t kill one of his own).

T:

Short for traitor.

D:

Short for detective.

Terrorist Radio Chat:

The “terrorist radio chat” is used by pressing whatever key is bound to “suit zoom”; this is unbound by default. When you use “terrorist radio chat,” you can look at a player, and press a number from 1-9 to say a variety of things in text chat using the player’s name (such as “<Name> is a traitor!” or “<Name> acts suspicious.”). If you are looking at nobody while using this, it will simply say “Nobody” in place of “<Name>”.

Art of Deception:

The most fun part of TTT (to me at least) is the psychological aspect of it. There are some tools you can use to get away with nearly any traitorous action. One is the idea of misdirection. For example, if you are in a group of innocents and you see someone standing some distance away, you can say “Hey someone is looking at us pretty suspiciously from over there!” When people turn to look, you can knife someone in the group and get outta there, before they even know what happened. Another tool is overloading someone’s brain with information. When an innocent comes into an area when you are shooting someone else, you can start shouting out “Hey, this guy’s a traitor! He shot me with a sniper! He’s crazy!” By the time the innocent has worked out what has actually happened, you will have finished killing the first one, and can turn your guns on the second. A third tool is being friendly. If people see you as their buddy for that round, they are much less likely to think you a traitor. You can go around with somebody for a whole round, picking off innocents when they are not looking. The person you have been with will most likely defend you if you are shot at, and he will not have the slightest suspicion that you are a traitor. Enlisting the help of unknowing innocents in this way can be most useful. There are many things you can do in TTT to deceive, and not all of them are confined simply to game mechanics; many are a result of the way you talk to others. As you can see from this, a microphone and some amount of acting skill is recommended for this game.

Traitor Traps and Traitor Rooms:

T traps are indicated by a red hand. Most are free, a few may cost a credit or two. Some may open a pit that innocents can fall into, some can turn off the lights in an area, there are really endless things that they can do. There will be a small text description when you hover your reticle over the red hand, which will give you some idea about what the trap will do when you activate it (which you do by pressing “e” when looking at the hand). Some can be activated over and over, others only once per round. Knowing what each T trap does is something learned over time, with experience and time spent playing on each map. Experiment, but make sure none of your traitor buddies are near the trap when you set it off, since you wouldn’t want to accidentally kill them.

Related to traitor traps are traitor rooms, which are activated the same way, by pressing “e” on the red hand. Make sure no innocents are around when you open these rooms, since that will reveal you as a traitor instantly. The room will open temporarily, giving you the opportunity to get inside. Inside the traitor room are usually a variety of windows that you can use to look out at portions of the map, offering intel about the location of innocents as well as easy access to a few traitor traps. There are sometimes cool gadgets like C4 spawners or knife spawners in these traitor rooms, but not always. There are also sometimes teleporters to various parts of the map, which the traitor can use to quickly make his way around. All of this is cool, but make sure not to stay in the traitor room too long, since innocents can’t really kill you while you are in this room. Most servers do not look kindly on “traitor room camping,” since it is unfair to the innocents, and the traitor can rarely kill everyone from inside the traitor room, so the round just drags on without progress.

Traitor Testers:

Traitor testers are simply machines that can hold (usually) one person. Someone else presses the button that starts the testing, and after a few seconds, a light will flash green or red, to show whether the player is an innocent or a terrorist. However, these “testers” are often unreliable, since there are some ways for traitors to trick innocents this way or lead them all into a trap. I recommend avoiding them in general, as they are known to cause pain and suffering most of the time. They can be useful in some cases though, if you really need to confirm that a certain person is innocent.

DNA Scanner:

Essentially, whenever a player is killed, his killer’s DNA is left on the body (unless the player was sniped from far away, in that case there would be no DNA left on the body). This DNA will wear off after a little time (the exact length varies based on distance between the killer and his victim, weapon used, and possibly some other variables that don’t really matter all that much). What the DNA scanner does is receive a sample of this DNA from the body. While holding the DNA scanner, the detective can left-click on a body (it has to be ID’ed) to get a sample of DNA. A beeping sound will happen, and the detective will be able to see an indicator of the killer’s location (which will update based on the distance from the detective to the location last scanned (I think?)). Since the detective doesn’t know the killer’s name based on the DNA, only his location, the detective will have to chase after the traitor to find out who it is, so he can either call him out in chat or kill him himself. After the traitor has been killed, the DNA scanner will be annoying and repeatedly beep with the location of the traitor’s body. When this occurs, you can right-click to open the DNA scanner’s menu, and remove the selected DNA sample, as you are now done with it.

The DNA scanner can also pick up DNA samples from some weapons, giving the location of the last player to have held it. This is sometimes useful when the detective finds a traitor weapon lying on the ground (a weapon that the traitor could only have purchased from the traitor shop). However, if an innocent picked the traitor weapon up (for whatever reason), the DNA will point to the innocent, so be careful about using DNA samples taken from weapons.

Credits:

A traitor begins a round with 2 credits, and is awarded a credit for each detective he himself kills, as well as when certain percentages of innocent players are dead (each 35% for most servers). A detective begins a round with 2 credits as well (1 on most servers) and is awarded one credit for each traitor killed, as well as one credit for each traitor he personally kills (no credits are awarded for this last one on most servers). Credits can also be exchanged between fellow traitors and fellow detectives. Additionally, a dead body’s credits can be stolen by pressing “e” on a dead body (the body will say how many credits it has on it in yellow text).

These credits are used to buy items from the t and d shop.

Basic Traitor Shop Items:

Body Armor

Grants you some resistance to damage.

Radar

Shows the locations of all live players, updates every 30 seconds. Green circles will be innocents, traitor buddies will be red.

Disguiser

When enabled, this hides your name from other players. After purchase, a new tab will exist in your t shop, called “disguiser.” This will let you enable and disable it. The only purpose this really has is to prevent someone from calling a KOS on you, since they don’t know who you are. They will know you’re a traitor however, since only traitors can disguise their names.

Doppleganger

In most cases a better version of the disguiser, since you can steal someone’s identity by left-clicking on them with this (they can be dead or alive, it matters not; just make sure they don’t see you do it). You can then right-click to assume their identity, which will make their name display to players instead of your own. This way, if they see you kill someone, they will call out the other player, at which point you can take off the disguise and get away safely.

Knife

Insta-kill weapon, can also be thrown with right-click. Can only be used once. Very useful in close quarters, though.

ID Bomb

This plants a bomb on an unidentified body, blowing up when the first person ID’s it. The body will be ID’ed, but the person doing the ID’ing will get blown up. When a body is rigged with this, a message will be sent to all traitor buddies informing them that the body is rigged (so that they don’t inadvertently get blown up).

Defib

This allows you to revive a dead traitor buddy. You have to hold down left-click on their body for a short time, and then they’re back alive, good as new! It’s best not to ID their body when doing this. This is because, when a traitor is confirmed dead, their role is revealed and their name is highlighted red on the scoreboard for everyone to see. If you revive them with the defib, and their body was ID’ed, their name will remain red on the scoreboard, letting everyone know to kill them… again.

And the rest of the items I will leave for you to discover on your own.

Basic Detective Shop Items:

Radar

Same as the traitor’s radar, except it will obviously not show the traitors as red circles, as that would give it away.

Visualizer

Can be thrown down next to a dead body to reconstruct the death scene. All players in a radius around the player at the time of death will be shown as ghostly images (without names). The killing bullet’s trajectory will also be shown. Very cool, but ultimately useless in most cases.

ID Bomb Defuser

Can be used if the detective suspects a body is rigged with the ID Bomb. Left-click on an unidentified body to defuse.

Defib

This is the same item as the one in T shop; that is, it can be used to revive dead players. However, in the detective’s case, he will want to revive dead innocents that he knows were killed by traitors. This way, the revived innocent can KOS whoever killed him. An important rule regarding this is: a spectating player that is revived by a defib must forget EVERYTHING he saw in spectator mode, OTHER than his killer. He cannot call out other T’s, since that would be an odd form of ghosting, in a way. Probably the weirdest and most counter-intuitive rule we have, but it makes sense if you think about it.

And the rest of the items I will leave for you to discover on your own.

Karma:

Karma is an automated feature of the game that is affected by how many team-kills you perform. It was intended to be a way to punish players who RDM’ed (and reward innocents who find traitors), but in the end, no automated system will be able to do that as well as a living staff member. As a result, karma is largely unimportant, except that some features of it still apply.

The default karma is 1000. If you go too much below 1000 (by team-killing), you will do less damage. There is no damage increase for going above 1000, however. Most servers will also automatically ban players who go below a certain karma, but Hearthigen has disabled that. We leave it up to the staff to decide matters of that nature.

Traitor Baiting:

Commonly just called “t baiting,” this is when a player shoots near another player, or even crowbars him once and runs away. This is an act of the first player attempting to “bait” the other player into killing him. It is frowned upon by all TTT servers I’ve ever been on, because it encourages a player to RDM, which then causes the game to be less fun. Don’t T bait. This includes throwing discombobs or crowbar pushing people when near ledges.

A Discussion of RDM:

RDM is a complicated subject, and often what causes people to not play TTT. However, if you have read the guide up until now, you should know what each role does, and thus there shouldn’t be any RDM. The biggest cause of RDM is usually ignorance, because somebody simply doesn’t know what to do as an innocent.

Again, RDM is team-killing and/or killing another player without proof (this even includes damaging another player; the player does not have to be killed; simply dealing damage is enough to qualify as RDM). Both of these things will ruin the experience of the player you killed, so don’t do it. Make sure you have proof before killing someone.

If you get RDM’ed, a message will usually pop up asking if you want to report your killer. If it does not pop up, you can type “!report” in chat. You can then type a message about what the player did, and submit it. The reported player will then have a chance to respond (either when he dies or when he types in “!respond”). After reading his response, you can then choose whether to forgive your killer or keep the report. If you forgive him, the staff will not punish anyone. If you keep the report, the staff will look into what happened, and possibly add a slay to the reported player (in which case he will not be able to play the next round, as punishment).

When reporting a player, make sure you actually say something of use in the report, instead of just spamming letters. It makes the staff’s job a lot easier. Also, if the reported player responds and sound truly sorry, why not forgive him? It’s not the end of the world that you got killed one round. If you forgive him, he will most likely forgive you, should you ever mess up and get reported by him.

Rules:

We’ve already covered some basic concepts, such as ghosting and RDM. But let’s take a moment to link the rules of Hearthigen’s server here:

http://hearthigen.com/threads/trouble-in-terrorist-town-rules.10/

Reading over them, you’ll notice that ghosting and RDM are punishable, like I’ve said. T baiting is mentioned as well. You know what all these things are now!

There are also the basics, like hacking and mic spam and harassment; obviously all these are punishable. That brings us to the point of traitorous acts, which are listed at the bottom of the rules. What is considered traitorous? Put another way, what actions can someone KOS you for?

Traitorous Acts:

Shooting someone who is proven

Shooting someone without calling them out as a traitor (some people will just kill everyone involved in a firefight, although this is not encouraged)

Being seen entering a t room

Holding a T weapon without saying that you got it from a dead T’s body

Breaking a tester

Throwing an incendiary grenade at people, or a discombob near ledges

Dealing damage to somebody, even if it’s with a crowbar

Being seen hanging a body (since only traitors can do this)

Numerous other map-specific things, as detailed in the rules

These things are not punishable by staff; rather, they are KOSable. These are two different things. You will not be slain for breaking a tester, for example, but you may very well be killed by another player for it.

While on the subject of KOSing, there are a few extra things to keep in mind. You can not KOS someone just because they are holding the same weapon as the one that a player was killed by (unless of course it is a T weapon). There are tons of duplicate weapons on the map; it would be silly to kill someone based off of one.

Related to this are playermodels. This was never a problem before PointShop came along, but all the same, it needs to be addressed. Imagine you turn a corner, and you see someone with with a Sonic the Hedgehog playermodel gun down an innocent. You aren’t able to see the killer’s name before he runs away. At this point, you CANNOT call anyone out as a traitor. You cannot say “Kill everyone with a Sonic model!” The reason for this is two-fold: firstly, people can easily change their playermodel mid-round, and secondly, playermodels were not intended to be a part of TTT, technically. They are an addon, and not one that should be used to KOS people.

Interactions with Staff:

Staff, at least on Hearthigen, are here to enjoy the game as well as moderate it. That is why it is wise, as a player, to make the staff’s job as easy as possible. If you suspect someone else of ghosting or hacking, message the staff ONCE. Do not overload them with messages about the subject. They will see it, and they will act accordingly. (Messaging staff, by the way, is done by prefacing your message with an “@”. For example, type in chat “@Hey admins!”)

Related to this, if you are RDMed, use the report system; do NOT message admins about RDM. On Hearthigen, we don’t comb through the damagelogs to punish every little offense. We simply look at the reports, and look further into those specific instances. If someone cares enough about being RDMed, they will report it. As mentioned earlier, if you forgive the attacker in the report, the staff will not look further into the incident.

This is what makes Hearthigen really stand out as a server, in my mind. We let people make a choice; we teach them forgiveness in this way. We will punish if someone does not forgive, but we do not enjoy it. All this combined makes for a very friendly and laid-back environment where people can become fast friends. A drawback of this, of course, is that people who are used to playing on servers that punish every little offense (and like it that way) will most likely not enjoy our server. That’s unavoidable however. We will not change the way we staff for the sake of those few. As a whole, I am of the firm belief that most people enjoy the way we do things at Hearthigen; they just haven’t been exposed to it before, since so few servers operate this way.

So, to have a good relationship with the staff, don’t use our leniency as an excuse to ruin other peoples’ gameplay. We’re happy to give you many chances (we even warn once for ghosting here, only banning you on the second offense), but that does not mean you will do well if you prioritize your own fun over everyone else’s. TTT only works if everyone has respect for everyone else’s gameplay experience, and we as staff will enforce that attitude.

Breaking the Rules:

At last! We have arrived at potentially the most important part of this entire guide. After spending all this time discussing the concepts and rules of this game, we’re going to throw them out. That’s right. TTT is an amazingly fun gamemode, and following the rules is important, as well as obeying staff. However, one of the most fun things about TTT is that there are so many ways to have fun without playing the game by the rules.

TTT offers players “free will,” offering them a path to follow but not forcing them onto it. For example, who says you can’t have some fun with the last innocent? If you’re in a 1v1 situation, why not ask the last innocent if he wants to have a Newton Launcher battle? (The Newton Launcher is a low-damage traitor weapon that pushes players back a little, usually used for pushing people off ledges). Usually, giving a traitor weapon to an innocent would violate the rules of TTT, but in this situation, no real harm is done. It’s an entertaining twist on normal gameplay, and makes for a suspenseful and hilarious 1v1. The dead players who are spectating will no doubt enjoy it as well, much more so than if they had been watching a run-of-the-mill M16 battle.

Things like this can be mid-round too, as long as the staff and other players are okay with it (which they usually will be on Hearthigen). For example, I created a mini-game a while back called Art Gallery. Essentially, when we are on the Roy the Ship map, there is a room below decks that traitors will hang bodies from, to create “art.” It’s an entertaining game, resulting in a very disgusting “art exhibit,” full of bodies hanging in ridiculous poses. This game can be against the rules, because if an innocent sees the traitor hanging a body, he usually does not kill him; he lets him continue his “art.”

So you see, some things can be against the rules, but still fun, as long as NOBODY is being left out. Art Gallery can become very un-fun, for instance, if someone gets killed right away at the beginning of each round and hung, without even getting the chance to play the rounds. In mini-games like this, it is important to not overdo them. For instance, my recommendation for Art Gallery is to only do it once or twice per map, just to give other players who want to play normal TTT a chance to do so.

TTT is not like most gamemodes, where the rules are set and enforced by game mechanics. In this way, TTT is a game that allows a lot of freedom. When used properly, this freedom can make TTT a more enjoyable experience for all.

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*This guide is not quite done, but it's still readable in its current state; none of the links to separate sections exist yet, however.*

(The important bits are bolded, if you just wanna skim through them.)

Trouble in Terrorist Town: A Guide

So you hop into your first TTT match, excited to shoot other terrorists, and you get shot five seconds into the round. Not only that, but people are accusing you of RDM somehow (whatever that is), even though you were only alive long enough to realize you were holding a crowbar. How is this gamemode supposed to be fun?

Well, allow me to show you, in this comprehensive guide on how to play TTT. Later on, we will also cover some of what you can expect from the TTT staff, so that you know how to properly interact with them in order that all involved can have a fun gaming experience. Towards the end, we will go over how “breaking the rules” in some cases can be fun and enjoyable for everyone (at least on Hearthigen). But before we delve into how you can safely break the rules, you need to have a solid understanding of the rules themselves.

Note: I recommend playing by the rules for your first few TTT sessions, in order to really gain an understanding of the gamemode and to gain the trust of the Hearthigen TTT staff. This is usually a vital step that must be taken before you can start playing a little more “rebelliously.”

Basic Concept of the Game:

TTT is about a group of terrorists who discover they have a traitor (or traitors) in their midst. The vast majority of the terrorists are “innocents,” that is, they have no objective other than to survive (accomplishing this usually requires finding out who the traitors are and killing them). A minority of the terrorists (usually 1/4 of the total players) are designated “traitors.” It is the job of these traitors to eliminate all the innocents. An even smaller minority (usually 1/8 of the total players) are detectives… but we’ll get to that later.

Game Structure:

The gametype takes place across many maps, and each map will contain around ten “rounds.” These rounds are all self-contained, and no information carries over from round to round (other than karma, which will be discussed in detail later).

Each round starts with a “preparing” phase that lasts around 15 seconds or so. This phase exists so that people can spawn in, grab the weapons they want from around the map, and get ready for the round. Nobody can damage each other during this phase, but you can still die from fall damage (although you will automatically respawn at the end of the preparing stage if you die).

At the end of this “preparing” stage, the player’s role is revealed to them (either innocent, traitor, or detective). At this point, people now know what their objective is, and players can now be killed. This phase contains all the core gameplay. Most servers (Hearthigen included) use the system called “haste mode,” which means that the round starts with five minutes left on the clock, and the round timer increases with each player killed (in Hearthigen’s case: 30 seconds per kill). Once the five minutes are up, the round goes into “overtime,” which lasts until the full round timer has run out. During this phase, traitors can see how much time is left in the round, but innocents and detectives cannot. This serves to hide from them how many people have died so far (since the amount of time left is equivalent to total deaths*30)

When the round is over (all innocents have been eliminated, all traitors have been eliminated and some innocents have survived, or the round timer ran out), a dialog box will pop up on screen saying which side won (along with some tabs for viewing the important events in the round and the scoreboard).

This starts the “end round” phase, which will last a roughly equivalent time to the “preparing” phase. This is simply a time for players to relax and talk to each other about how awesome the round was, as well as look over the tabs on the dialog box (if they want to). Most servers, Hearthigen included, allow players who are still alive after the events of the round to attempt to kill each other. No points are awarded for this “post-round dm”, but it sure is fun. :)

Note: The only significant thing about “overtime” (as far as Hearthigen is concerned) is that it is then okay to kill AFKs (since they could be traitors and we wouldn’t want the round to drag on further).

Roles:

No matter what role you are (innocent, traitor, or detective), you must observe. Listen to voice chat, read text chat, and look at your surroundings. This is one of the main reasons that people mess up in TTT; they do not observe. For example, knowing that somebody has already been called out as a traitor is important, so that you know to shoot at them if you see them.

You must also check the scoreboard regularly, by pressing “tab.” It shows each players kills and deaths, as well as karma, but all that is not of much importance. The thing you need to be paying attention to is which category each player is listed under: “terrorists” or “confirmed dead.” There is a third category that only traitors can see, but that’s discussed in more detail here. If a player is listed under “terrorists,” they are alive, or at least nobody knows they are dead yet. If a player is listed under “confirmed dead,” they are… dead, obviously. Knowing how many traitors there are is important (and Hearthigen’s server will tell you at the beginning of each round how many traitors and innocents there are). Process of elimination can often be used in this game. If you see that only you and one other player is listed under “terrorists,” and you are innocent, you then know that the other live player is a traitor.

Note: There is a fourth category in the tab menu: “spectators.” This is just for people who aren’t playing or who have just loaded into the server, however, and so is not of particular importance to this guide.

So, observe and remember to “check tab.” Now let’s discuss each role in a bit more detail.

Innocent (Green):

If you are an “innocent,” it is in your best interest to find (or purchase from PointShop) a weapon that you can use to defend yourself. If somebody starts shooting you, shoot back. While you’re shooting back, call out that whoever is shooting you is a traitor (use their name please; there’s very little in life more annoying than hearing somebody scream “Um! This man… this uh… he’s a traitor! This guy is a trai-“). For this reason, a microphone is exceptionally helpful in TTT, since typing would likely get you killed in a situation like this. There is a “terrorist radio chat” feature available as well, discussed here.

If you see someone shooting someone else (assuming nobody said anything beforehand in chat), shoot the person who started it. Sometimes, someone will call out a traitor in chat, and so you have to check to make sure the person being shot is not the traitor before taking action. If they happen to be the traitor who was called out, help the person already shooting. As you most likely see by now, the action you take can vary greatly on the context of the situation.

As an innocent, you must protect the detective(s), as they are your best hope for finding the traitors. (This is due to the fact that detectives have access to special items that are used to track down traitors.) If a detective orders you to do something, do it (within reason; obviously ordering you to jump off a ledge is silly).

Find the traitors. Kill ‘em. You have the advantage of numbers; they have the advantages of surprise and cool gadgets.

Traitor (Red):

If you are a “traitor,” it is advantageous to open traitor shop immediately, and purchase whatever items you think will help you the most (I recommend body armor and radar as your first purchases, myself). If you don’t plan on using traitor shop that round, send your credits to your traitor buddies (whose names are highlighted red on the tab scoreboard, and are also shown to you at the beginning of the round). You can also press “u” to use team text chat in order to communicate with your traitor buddies. You can also press “shift” to use traitor-only voice chat (your voice indicator will be red when using this). It is also important to note that your traitor buddies will have a red “T” over their heads throughout the round, which can be seen across the map and through walls. This can help give you an indication of where your buddies are and what they are doing.

It is then up to you and your traitor buddies to coordinate your actions to eradicate the innocents and detectives. It is generally wise to kill detectives first, since they are the ones most likely to find out that you are a traitor. You also get more credits for the traitor shop by doing this, as mentioned earlier.

It is wise to act when you are alone with another innocent. This way, you will be able to kill the innocent before he is able to call out that you are a traitor. Maintaining stealth is important as a traitor. If one of your traitor buddies is in trouble, it is likewise advantageous to help him. However, there are cases when it is better to not do this. If there are many innocents around, it makes more sense for you to do nothing, and let your traitor buddy die. This way, you will be able to keep secret the fact that you are a traitor, and thus you can live on and avenge his death later. It feels cruel to let a comrade die, but hey, you are traitors, after all.

While we’re on the topic of traitor buddies, it’s also smart to communicate what you’re about to do, so that your plans don’t harm your buddies. For example, if you plan to go out in a blaze of glory and start shooting up a room of innocents, be a good teammate and tell your buddy that you’re about to do so. This way, he can either leave the room so that he can live on, or he can help you kill the innocents, depending on the situation and the chances of survival.

You can also use deception. Instead of calling out someone who shot you, like innocents do, you can simply call out anyone you like. For example, “<Player Name> shot at me! Kill him!”. If you get caught in a lie however, you will find yourself being called out as a traitor. Let’s say the person you falsely accused of shooting you is traveling with a group of innocents, who can all plainly see that he didn’t shoot at you. In that case, you’d be in trouble. The art of deception as a traitor is discussed more here.

On some maps, traitors also have access to a variety of “T traps” and sometimes “T rooms,” discussed here.

Detective (Blue):

If you are a “detective,” your name is highlighted in blue on the scoreboard for all to see. You also automatically have body armor equipped, so you’re just a bit stronger than your innocent comrades. The detective is the most misunderstood role in TTT, since it’s the rarest role to get, and most people just view it as another “innocent.” When used properly however, the detective can lead the innocents to victory.

The detective has a detective shop he can access, full of tools to combat the traitors. (I recommend buying the radar first.) You can also use “u” to use team chat, which in some cases may be useful if you are trying to coordinate actions between detectives (this is a fairly rare occurrence though; usually detectives just talk in “all” chat).

Detectives are a proven innocent (since it is not possible for them to be both a detective and a traitor), so they are in a unique position to “test” people and call out kill orders. On several maps, there are “traitor testers” that are usually used by detectives. These are discussed in more detail here.

Detectives can call out kill orders on players (if they have proof that the player in question is a traitor, of course), and innocents don’t need to question whether the kill order is legitimate (as they might have to if the order were given by someone else, who may or may not be a traitor), because a detective would have no reason to deceive anyone. This puts detective in a position of power, somewhat. On the other hand, detectives also need to be careful, since they are likely to be the first target for traitors.

Probably the most important part of being a detective has to do with the “role” slot, which is used for the detective’s DNA scanner, an exceptionally useful tool. The DNA scanner is described more here.

In some maps (this is very rare), there are “detective rooms,” which function similarly to “traitor rooms.” Although, I don’t really see why a detective would need a room to himself; seems kinda silly. I don’t know, but some maps have ‘em. They’ll usually be indicated by blue coloring of some sort, so that the detective can feel special.

Mechanics:

The mechanics are very similar to Counter-Strike: Source, which makes sense since TTT is built from the assets of that game. This brings up an important point: namely, CS:S is required for TTT. It’s really not a fun gamemode without it, since most of the items will appear as error signs or pink and black checkerboards.

Hearthigen’s TTT server lends itself to some CS:GO mechanics as well. The aiming system feels more fluid than most servers, and I’m not just saying that. It truly feels distinct from other TTT servers.

Hearthigen also automatically gives players a higher jump height and health regen over time. These two things change the gameplay drastically from other TTT servers.

Looking at a Player:

When you hover your reticle over a player, you can see their name, a one-word description of their health (“healthy,” “near-death,” etc.), and their karma status (which will be discussed later). You can also use the tab menu to mark certain players as “innocent,” “kill,” etc., so that when you look at them, that will also be displayed. (I don’t use that feature very often, but if it’s convenient for you, go ahead and use it.)

Default Items and How to Use Them:

Everyone’s default item, no matter their role, is the crowbar. This is essentially your melee weapon, which you can use to hit people (though that is rarely useful) or break open vents, press buttons, etc. You can also right-click with it to “push” people forward a bit (this will do no direct damage to them, though you could knock them off a cliff or something).

The second default item is the magneto stick, an item that is often overlooked, despite its usefulness. This is what you use to interact with the environment. You can use left-click to give objects a little push, but more importantly, you can use right-click to pick up items. You do NOT have to hold right-click in order to do this, a mistake which newer players often make. Simply click once, and you will have picked up an item (assuming it isn’t too heavy for you to lift). There is a way to “throw” items by whipping your mouse across the screen and right-clicking a second time, letting go of the object and letting it continue its momentum. This is generally how people “prop-kill” other players, by using a prop’s velocity to damage another player upon contact.

Note: Keep in mind, you can also pick up ammo and guns from hard-to-reach places with your magneto stick! These items will automatically be added to your inventory when brought close enough to your character.

Note: The magneto stick can ALSO be used to pick up dead bodies, a very useful thing in some instances. When holding a body, traitors can click when looking at a wall or a ceiling to hang a dead body from it, to spook the innocents.

The third default “item” is holstered. This is just a stance in which your character is not holding anything. This can make you appear less threatening to others. That’s… about it for this one.

Weapon Slots:

It is at this point that I should mention that you have a set amount of “slots” in your inventory: 1-9. These can be accessed quickly by pressing the number keys (or you can just scroll though ‘em with mouse wheel, like most people probably do). You will have to scroll to whatever weapon you want, and then left-click to confirm that you want to pull that weapon out.

Your default starting items take up three slots already, which leaves you with one primary slot, one secondary slot, one grenade slot, one “role” slot (only used for the detective’s DNA scanner, I believe), and two “special” slots (usually only used by traitors and detectives). This means you can only carry one primary and one secondary, which means that if you want to grab a pistol off the ground, you must switch to your currently equipped pistol and press “q” to drop it, thereby letting your character to automatically pick up the next pistol you walk over.

Weapons Placed Around the Map:

There is an endless variety of primary and secondary guns that spawn around the map; there’s no possible way I could cover them all here. Additionally, on Hearthigen at least, we are continuously working to bring you balanced gameplay by tweaking each and every weapon, so they may change considerably over time. Many of the weapons used are from CS:S, but some are created by modders, and others are created by us. Ammunition is also placed around the map.

The ‘nade slot, on the other hand, is fairly limited. There are generally only three grenades, though of course there are addons that can provide more. The first main grenade is the smoke grenade, which… does exactly what it sounds like, provides a smoke screen. The second is an incendiary grenade, which will detonate with an extremely small explosion and set fire to the area around it. The third is the discombobulator, which is a non-lethal grenade that pushes things around it and can move nearby players, disorienting them. These three grenades can be useful, in fairly limited scenarios. Mostly they’re just fun to mess around with.

Special Weapons:

Traitors and detectives have access to special traitor and detective shops, respectively. The only difference between the two is that they provide different items, suited for each role. Both can be accessed by pressing “c”. There are special weapons that can be purchased from these shops, in exchange for credits. Credits are discussed more here.

These special weapons purchased from traitor and detective shops vary from server to server, and some items are arguably more useful than others. Each item costs 1 credit, in order to keep it simple. Some are passive items, such as body armor (which detectives have automatically) or radars. Others are used for deception, such as the disguiser, radio, advanced disguiser, decoy, or ID bomb in the traitor shop. Others are used for detective work, such as the defuser or the visualizer in the detective shop. And then the rest are just plain weapons, used for killing players more efficiently. Most of these will take up one of the two “special” slots upon purchase.

I encourage you to experiment with all these traitor and detective weapons, as they are all interesting, and can be utilized in a variety of situations to make your role just a little easier.

Note: You can still use the movement keys while you are in the traitor or detective shop, which is useful because continuing to move forward while using the shop will prevent you from being a sitting duck, should somebody take that time to shoot at you. It will also prevent players from saying “LOOK! THAT GUY’S IN THE T SHOP; HE’S NOT MOVIN’!”.

PointShop:

This is actually separate from the TTT gamemode, but is included in most servers as an addon. If you have played Gmod before, you are most likely familiar with this one. The pointshop can be accessed with F3, and you can use in-game points (accumulated automatically over time, or via some special actions, such as joining the Hearthigen steam group) to purchase items. In Hearthigen’s TTT pointshop, there are several tabs. The first is Weapons, which allows you to purchase weapons that would be placed around the map. You only get these for one round. There are also Donator tabs for donators and staff, from which can be purchased some “special” weapons as well (i.e. things that would normally be purchased from the traitor or detective shop). There are also playermodels and hats and trails, like most pointshops. None of these affect gameplay, and so are not worth discussing further here.

I’m Dead, What Do I Do?:

You don’t have to do anything; in fact, you should NOT communicate with living players. This is not possible in-game, since living players cannot hear nor see dead chat. However, if you communicate with a living player in TeamSpeak, Skype, Steam message, private admin message, etc., then you are doing what is known as “ghosting.” Ghosting, put simply, is giving players information that they would not otherwise know, through out-of-game means. After you are dead, you are dead. Living players will have to figure out what happened by themselves. That’s the fun of the game; don’t spoil it by ghosting.

When you are dead, you can spectate other players, which can be fun in some cases. You can also take control of props, which is an interesting mini-game within TTT. You do this by going into free-cam mode and pressing “e” on a prop. You can then spam the movement keys (including jump) when your “punch-o-meter” is high enough. This feature prevents people from spamming props around the map, but still allows them to move occasionally.

However, the prop possession mini-game is mostly dead now, thanks to a new mini-game that a majority of servers include: death-match. This is simply Counter-Strike: Source: Laggy Edition. It’s not bad, but it could definitely use improvement in my opinion. Regardless, you shoot each other with guns, with infinite respawns, until the round ends. You can enter this by typing “!dm” in dead chat. You can leave it the same way, should you desire. Pressing tab will allow you to see who is in death-match (in a fifth category!); living players can not see this category, since that would reveal to them who the dead players are (which would ruin the game somewhat).

Tab Menu in Detail:

There are three main categories in the tab menu: “terrorists,” “missing in action,” and “confirmed dead,” in that order. We have already discussed “terrorists” and “confirmed dead,” and every role can see those, so let’s move on to “missing in action.” This is a category that only traitors can see. It lists those players who are dead, but whose bodies have not yet been identified (meaning nobody else knows they are dead). This is a vital aspect to the game, since it allows the traitors to know who is dead, while also allowing them to deceive the innocents into thinking that there are more players alive than there actually are. This hinders the innocents’ ability to use the “process of elimination,” because they don’t know which players are actually dead.

So what moves a player from “missing in action” to “confirmed dead” (or from the innocents’ point of view, from “terrorists” to “confirmed dead”)? This is where identifying (or ID’ing) bodies comes into play.

ID’ing Bodies:

When a player is killed, their body is not automatically identified. It is instead shown as an “unidentified body,” as shown here:

[ATTACH=full]830[/ATTACH]

When someone presses “e” on the body, it opens a menu for them, listing a lot of information about the dead player (their name, the last player they saw before dying, the weapon they were killed by, if they were headshot or not, the amount of time before the DNA expires, the time in the round they were killed at, their last words if they were typing in chat at the time of death, etc.). I personally rarely find a need to look at any of this information, though in some cases it could be helpful. Usually I just quickly double-tap “e” to open and close the menu quickly, so I can keep moving. Why even bother to stop and ID the body at all then, you ask? Well, because the menu is only part of what ID’ing the body does. More importantly, ID’ing lets everyone in the server know that the player is dead, what their role was, and that I ID’ed the body, as shown here:

[ATTACH=full]832[/ATTACH]

It will also change the body from saying “unidentified body” to listing the player’s name, as shown here:

[ATTACH=full]831[/ATTACH]

After the body is “ID’ed” in this way, the dead player will be listed under “confirmed dead” for everyone. This gives the innocents/detectives one less player to think about, and allows them to find the traitor more easily, since there are less players for them to suspect. For this reason, traitors will usually hide unidentified bodies in corners or closets. However, they must be careful when doing this, since getting seen while carrying an unidentified body will most likely result in death. Innocents would have no reason not to ID the body, and so people will assume that whoever is carrying the unidentified body is a traitor (which in most cases, they are).

Note: The menu that is shown when ID’ing a body also contains a button that says “call detective.” This can be pressed to create an indicator on the screen of a detective that will lead them to the body, usually so they can get DNA off of it. Traitors can be super sneaky and use this feature to lure a detective to a body in order to kill them. Be careful, detectives.

ID’ing a body is also what the traitors/detectives use to grab credits off a dead body (as mentioned earlier). Any unused credits will remain on the body, and are up for grabs. In this instance, the little-used feature of pressing “alt-e” on the body can be useful. Pressing “alt-e” on a body allows you to view the menu of the body, grabbing any credits off of it, WITHOUT actually ID’ing the body! This means it will remain like this:

[ATTACH=full]830[/ATTACH]

One more thing to go over in this section (I know talking about pressing “e” on corpses isn’t all that thrilling). If you walk past an unidentified body, people will most likely scream at you to “ID that body!” This is because, as I said before, an innocent would have no reason not to ID a body. Therefore, walking past an unidentified body (even if you just didn’t notice it) immediately makes players suspicious of you. As an innocent, it is in your best interest to ID any and all bodies you come across. If you are a traitor and you are walking with some innocents, it is also in your best interest to ID that body. Sure, you don’t really want to ID the body as a traitor, but it’s better than getting shot because you walked past it.

Terms to Know:

There are a few terms specific to TTT that are important to know. I’ve already gone over all the concepts associated with these terms; I just haven’t used the terms explicitly.

KOS:

Kill on Sight.

This is used when someone is calling someone else out as a traitor. Instead of saying “<Player Name> is a traitor!” they just say “KOS <Player Name>!”. It’s quicker, and you’re more likely to be able to get it out through voice chat before getting killed.

RDM:

Random Death Match.

This is when a player kills another member of his team (i.e. innocent kills innocent). This can be a mistake or a result of a traitor’s deception, but often it is just a player being stupid. Randomly killing another member of your team is bad; don’t do it. The staff will punish you for doing this, no matter if it’s an innocent killing an innocent, a detective killing an innocent, an innocent killing a detective, or a traitor killing a traitor. Of course, the staff will make every effort to ensure it wasn’t just a mistake (firefights can get out of hand sometimes, leading to friendly fire). RDM can ALSO be killing another player without proof, even if that player ends up being a traitor. RDM is covered in more detail here.

Suspicion:

Not quite a KOS.

Players can call suspicion on another player for doing something… well… suspicious. If someone’s killing someone else, you call a KOS on them. If someone’s following someone else while aiming at them, you call suspicion (since there is not enough proof for a full-fledged KOS). In my opinion, calling suspicion on another player is entirely pointless, since nobody remembers who was suspicious ten seconds after, since there is so much going on in each round. I would just stick to KOS’s if you have proof, myself.

Proven:

Someone who is a confirmed innocent.

Someone can be proven if they are shown to be innocent by being “tested.” Someone can also be proven if they kill a traitor (since a traitor wouldn’t kill one of his own).

T:

Short for traitor.

D:

Short for detective.

Terrorist Radio Chat:

The “terrorist radio chat” is used by pressing whatever key is bound to “suit zoom”; this is unbound by default. When you use “terrorist radio chat,” you can look at a player, and press a number from 1-9 to say a variety of things in text chat using the player’s name (such as “<Name> is a traitor!” or “<Name> acts suspicious.”). If you are looking at nobody while using this, it will simply say “Nobody” in place of “<Name>”.

Art of Deception:

The most fun part of TTT (to me at least) is the psychological aspect of it. There are some tools you can use to get away with nearly any traitorous action. One is the idea of misdirection. For example, if you are in a group of innocents and you see someone standing some distance away, you can say “Hey someone is looking at us pretty suspiciously from over there!” When people turn to look, you can knife someone in the group and get outta there, before they even know what happened. Another tool is overloading someone’s brain with information. When an innocent comes into an area when you are shooting someone else, you can start shouting out “Hey, this guy’s a traitor! He shot me with a sniper! He’s crazy!” By the time the innocent has worked out what has actually happened, you will have finished killing the first one, and can turn your guns on the second. A third tool is being friendly. If people see you as their buddy for that round, they are much less likely to think you a traitor. You can go around with somebody for a whole round, picking off innocents when they are not looking. The person you have been with will most likely defend you if you are shot at, and he will not have the slightest suspicion that you are a traitor. Enlisting the help of unknowing innocents in this way can be most useful. There are many things you can do in TTT to deceive, and not all of them are confined simply to game mechanics; many are a result of the way you talk to others. As you can see from this, a microphone and some amount of acting skill is recommended for this game.

Traitor Traps and Traitor Rooms:

T traps are indicated by a red hand. Most are free, a few may cost a credit or two. Some may open a pit that innocents can fall into, some can turn off the lights in an area, there are really endless things that they can do. There will be a small text description when you hover your reticle over the red hand, which will give you some idea about what the trap will do when you activate it (which you do by pressing “e” when looking at the hand). Some can be activated over and over, others only once per round. Knowing what each T trap does is something learned over time, with experience and time spent playing on each map. Experiment, but make sure none of your traitor buddies are near the trap when you set it off, since you wouldn’t want to accidentally kill them.

Related to traitor traps are traitor rooms, which are activated the same way, by pressing “e” on the red hand. Make sure no innocents are around when you open these rooms, since that will reveal you as a traitor instantly. The room will open temporarily, giving you the opportunity to get inside. Inside the traitor room are usually a variety of windows that you can use to look out at portions of the map, offering intel about the location of innocents as well as easy access to a few traitor traps. There are sometimes cool gadgets like C4 spawners or knife spawners in these traitor rooms, but not always. There are also sometimes teleporters to various parts of the map, which the traitor can use to quickly make his way around. All of this is cool, but make sure not to stay in the traitor room too long, since innocents can’t really kill you while you are in this room. Most servers do not look kindly on “traitor room camping,” since it is unfair to the innocents, and the traitor can rarely kill everyone from inside the traitor room, so the round just drags on without progress.

Traitor Testers:

Traitor testers are simply machines that can hold (usually) one person. Someone else presses the button that starts the testing, and after a few seconds, a light will flash green or red, to show whether the player is an innocent or a terrorist. However, these “testers” are often unreliable, since there are some ways for traitors to trick innocents this way or lead them all into a trap. I recommend avoiding them in general, as they are known to cause pain and suffering most of the time. They can be useful in some cases though, if you really need to confirm that a certain person is innocent.

DNA Scanner:

Essentially, whenever a player is killed, his killer’s DNA is left on the body (unless the player was sniped from far away, in that case there would be no DNA left on the body). This DNA will wear off after a little time (the exact length varies based on distance between the killer and his victim, weapon used, and possibly some other variables that don’t really matter all that much). What the DNA scanner does is receive a sample of this DNA from the body. While holding the DNA scanner, the detective can left-click on a body (it has to be ID’ed) to get a sample of DNA. A beeping sound will happen, and the detective will be able to see an indicator of the killer’s location (which will update based on the distance from the detective to the location last scanned (I think?)). Since the detective doesn’t know the killer’s name based on the DNA, only his location, the detective will have to chase after the traitor to find out who it is, so he can either call him out in chat or kill him himself. After the traitor has been killed, the DNA scanner will be annoying and repeatedly beep with the location of the traitor’s body. When this occurs, you can right-click to open the DNA scanner’s menu, and remove the selected DNA sample, as you are now done with it.

The DNA scanner can also pick up DNA samples from some weapons, giving the location of the last player to have held it. This is sometimes useful when the detective finds a traitor weapon lying on the ground (a weapon that the traitor could only have purchased from the traitor shop). However, if an innocent picked the traitor weapon up (for whatever reason), the DNA will point to the innocent, so be careful about using DNA samples taken from weapons.

Credits:

A traitor begins a round with 2 credits, and is awarded a credit for each detective he himself kills, as well as when certain percentages of innocent players are dead (each 35% for most servers). A detective begins a round with 2 credits as well (1 on most servers) and is awarded one credit for each traitor killed, as well as one credit for each traitor he personally kills (no credits are awarded for this last one on most servers). Credits can also be exchanged between fellow traitors and fellow detectives. Additionally, a dead body’s credits can be stolen by pressing “e” on a dead body (the body will say how many credits it has on it in yellow text).

These credits are used to buy items from the t and d shop.

Basic Traitor Shop Items:

Body Armor

Grants you some resistance to damage.

Radar

Shows the locations of all live players, updates every 30 seconds. Green circles will be innocents, traitor buddies will be red.

Disguiser

When enabled, this hides your name from other players. After purchase, a new tab will exist in your t shop, called “disguiser.” This will let you enable and disable it. The only purpose this really has is to prevent someone from calling a KOS on you, since they don’t know who you are. They will know you’re a traitor however, since only traitors can disguise their names.

Doppleganger

In most cases a better version of the disguiser, since you can steal someone’s identity by left-clicking on them with this (they can be dead or alive, it matters not; just make sure they don’t see you do it). You can then right-click to assume their identity, which will make their name display to players instead of your own. This way, if they see you kill someone, they will call out the other player, at which point you can take off the disguise and get away safely.

Knife

Insta-kill weapon, can also be thrown with right-click. Can only be used once. Very useful in close quarters, though.

ID Bomb

This plants a bomb on an unidentified body, blowing up when the first person ID’s it. The body will be ID’ed, but the person doing the ID’ing will get blown up. When a body is rigged with this, a message will be sent to all traitor buddies informing them that the body is rigged (so that they don’t inadvertently get blown up).

Defib

This allows you to revive a dead traitor buddy. You have to hold down left-click on their body for a short time, and then they’re back alive, good as new! It’s best not to ID their body when doing this. This is because, when a traitor is confirmed dead, their role is revealed and their name is highlighted red on the scoreboard for everyone to see. If you revive them with the defib, and their body was ID’ed, their name will remain red on the scoreboard, letting everyone know to kill them… again.

And the rest of the items I will leave for you to discover on your own.

Basic Detective Shop Items:

Radar

Same as the traitor’s radar, except it will obviously not show the traitors as red circles, as that would give it away.

Visualizer

Can be thrown down next to a dead body to reconstruct the death scene. All players in a radius around the player at the time of death will be shown as ghostly images (without names). The killing bullet’s trajectory will also be shown. Very cool, but ultimately useless in most cases.

ID Bomb Defuser

Can be used if the detective suspects a body is rigged with the ID Bomb. Left-click on an unidentified body to defuse.

Defib

This is the same item as the one in T shop; that is, it can be used to revive dead players. However, in the detective’s case, he will want to revive dead innocents that he knows were killed by traitors. This way, the revived innocent can KOS whoever killed him. An important rule regarding this is: a spectating player that is revived by a defib must forget EVERYTHING he saw in spectator mode, OTHER than his killer. He cannot call out other T’s, since that would be an odd form of ghosting, in a way. Probably the weirdest and most counter-intuitive rule we have, but it makes sense if you think about it.

And the rest of the items I will leave for you to discover on your own.

Karma:

Karma is an automated feature of the game that is affected by how many team-kills you perform. It was intended to be a way to punish players who RDM’ed (and reward innocents who find traitors), but in the end, no automated system will be able to do that as well as a living staff member. As a result, karma is largely unimportant, except that some features of it still apply.

The default karma is 1000. If you go too much below 1000 (by team-killing), you will do less damage. There is no damage increase for going above 1000, however. Most servers will also automatically ban players who go below a certain karma, but Hearthigen has disabled that. We leave it up to the staff to decide matters of that nature.

Traitor Baiting:

Commonly just called “t baiting,” this is when a player shoots near another player, or even crowbars him once and runs away. This is an act of the first player attempting to “bait” the other player into killing him. It is frowned upon by all TTT servers I’ve ever been on, because it encourages a player to RDM, which then causes the game to be less fun. Don’t T bait. This includes throwing discombobs or crowbar pushing people when near ledges.

A Discussion of RDM:

RDM is a complicated subject, and often what causes people to not play TTT. However, if you have read the guide up until now, you should know what each role does, and thus there shouldn’t be any RDM. The biggest cause of RDM is usually ignorance, because somebody simply doesn’t know what to do as an innocent.

Again, RDM is team-killing and/or killing another player without proof (this even includes damaging another player; the player does not have to be killed; simply dealing damage is enough to qualify as RDM). Both of these things will ruin the experience of the player you killed, so don’t do it. Make sure you have proof before killing someone.

If you get RDM’ed, a message will usually pop up asking if you want to report your killer. If it does not pop up, you can type “!report” in chat. You can then type a message about what the player did, and submit it. The reported player will then have a chance to respond (either when he dies or when he types in “!respond”). After reading his response, you can then choose whether to forgive your killer or keep the report. If you forgive him, the staff will not punish anyone. If you keep the report, the staff will look into what happened, and possibly add a slay to the reported player (in which case he will not be able to play the next round, as punishment).

When reporting a player, make sure you actually say something of use in the report, instead of just spamming letters. It makes the staff’s job a lot easier. Also, if the reported player responds and sound truly sorry, why not forgive him? It’s not the end of the world that you got killed one round. If you forgive him, he will most likely forgive you, should you ever mess up and get reported by him.

Rules:

We’ve already covered some basic concepts, such as ghosting and RDM. But let’s take a moment to link the rules of Hearthigen’s server here:

http://hearthigen.com/threads/trouble-in-terrorist-town-rules.10/

Reading over them, you’ll notice that ghosting and RDM are punishable, like I’ve said. T baiting is mentioned as well. You know what all these things are now!

There are also the basics, like hacking and mic spam and harassment; obviously all these are punishable. That brings us to the point of traitorous acts, which are listed at the bottom of the rules. What is considered traitorous? Put another way, what actions can someone KOS you for?

Traitorous Acts:

Shooting someone who is proven

Shooting someone without calling them out as a traitor (some people will just kill everyone involved in a firefight, although this is not encouraged)

Being seen entering a t room

Holding a T weapon without saying that you got it from a dead T’s body

Breaking a tester

Throwing an incendiary grenade at people, or a discombob near ledges

Dealing damage to somebody, even if it’s with a crowbar

Being seen hanging a body (since only traitors can do this)

Numerous other map-specific things, as detailed in the rules

These things are not punishable by staff; rather, they are KOSable. These are two different things. You will not be slain for breaking a tester, for example, but you may very well be killed by another player for it.

While on the subject of KOSing, there are a few extra things to keep in mind. You can not KOS someone just because they are holding the same weapon as the one that a player was killed by (unless of course it is a T weapon). There are tons of duplicate weapons on the map; it would be silly to kill someone based off of one.

Related to this are playermodels. This was never a problem before PointShop came along, but all the same, it needs to be addressed. Imagine you turn a corner, and you see someone with with a Sonic the Hedgehog playermodel gun down an innocent. You aren’t able to see the killer’s name before he runs away. At this point, you CANNOT call anyone out as a traitor. You cannot say “Kill everyone with a Sonic model!” The reason for this is two-fold: firstly, people can easily change their playermodel mid-round, and secondly, playermodels were not intended to be a part of TTT, technically. They are an addon, and not one that should be used to KOS people.

Interactions with Staff:

Staff, at least on Hearthigen, are here to enjoy the game as well as moderate it. That is why it is wise, as a player, to make the staff’s job as easy as possible. If you suspect someone else of ghosting or hacking, message the staff ONCE. Do not overload them with messages about the subject. They will see it, and they will act accordingly. (Messaging staff, by the way, is done by prefacing your message with an “@”. For example, type in chat “@Hey admins!”)

Related to this, if you are RDMed, use the report system; do NOT message admins about RDM. On Hearthigen, we don’t comb through the damagelogs to punish every little offense. We simply look at the reports, and look further into those specific instances. If someone cares enough about being RDMed, they will report it. As mentioned earlier, if you forgive the attacker in the report, the staff will not look further into the incident.

This is what makes Hearthigen really stand out as a server, in my mind. We let people make a choice; we teach them forgiveness in this way. We will punish if someone does not forgive, but we do not enjoy it. All this combined makes for a very friendly and laid-back environment where people can become fast friends. A drawback of this, of course, is that people who are used to playing on servers that punish every little offense (and like it that way) will most likely not enjoy our server. That’s unavoidable however. We will not change the way we staff for the sake of those few. As a whole, I am of the firm belief that most people enjoy the way we do things at Hearthigen; they just haven’t been exposed to it before, since so few servers operate this way.

So, to have a good relationship with the staff, don’t use our leniency as an excuse to ruin other peoples’ gameplay. We’re happy to give you many chances (we even warn once for ghosting here, only banning you on the second offense), but that does not mean you will do well if you prioritize your own fun over everyone else’s. TTT only works if everyone has respect for everyone else’s gameplay experience, and we as staff will enforce that attitude.

Breaking the Rules:

At last! We have arrived at potentially the most important part of this entire guide. After spending all this time discussing the concepts and rules of this game, we’re going to throw them out. That’s right. TTT is an amazingly fun gamemode, and following the rules is important, as well as obeying staff. However, one of the most fun things about TTT is that there are so many ways to have fun without playing the game by the rules.

TTT offers players “free will,” offering them a path to follow but not forcing them onto it. For example, who says you can’t have some fun with the last innocent? If you’re in a 1v1 situation, why not ask the last innocent if he wants to have a Newton Launcher battle? (The Newton Launcher is a low-damage traitor weapon that pushes players back a little, usually used for pushing people off ledges). Usually, giving a traitor weapon to an innocent would violate the rules of TTT, but in this situation, no real harm is done. It’s an entertaining twist on normal gameplay, and makes for a suspenseful and hilarious 1v1. The dead players who are spectating will no doubt enjoy it as well, much more so than if they had been watching a run-of-the-mill M16 battle.

Things like this can be mid-round too, as long as the staff and other players are okay with it (which they usually will be on Hearthigen). For example, I created a mini-game a while back called Art Gallery. Essentially, when we are on the Roy the Ship map, there is a room below decks that traitors will hang bodies from, to create “art.” It’s an entertaining game, resulting in a very disgusting “art exhibit,” full of bodies hanging in ridiculous poses. This game can be against the rules, because if an innocent sees the traitor hanging a body, he usually does not kill him; he lets him continue his “art.”

So you see, some things can be against the rules, but still fun, as long as NOBODY is being left out. Art Gallery can become very un-fun, for instance, if someone gets killed right away at the beginning of each round and hung, without even getting the chance to play the rounds. In mini-games like this, it is important to not overdo them. For instance, my recommendation for Art Gallery is to only do it once or twice per map, just to give other players who want to play normal TTT a chance to do so.

TTT is not like most gamemodes, where the rules are set and enforced by game mechanics. In this way, TTT is a game that allows a lot of freedom. When used properly, this freedom can make TTT a more enjoyable experience for all.

Damn that would suck to type that all. But Im glad that you did it

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